High Contrast Photo Taken with my 70D


(Pennsylvania)

Smooth handling of contrasty ceiling lights

Smooth handling of contrasty ceiling lights

In my eyes one of the shortcomings for digital photography in general has always been how sensors handle the transition from blown away highlights to usable highlights.

Up until recently the transitions have been too abrupt from the overexposed highlights that come from photographing actual sources light like ceiling lights, the sun, the moon, or even spectral reflections.


Here is the link to this image, magnified to show it better. Link to Magnified Image


There is some lens flare, which is normal for this type of situation, but it's the clean handling of the highlight that impressed me.

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High ISO photo with 70D at museum


(Philadelphia PA)

70D set at ISO 12,800

70D set at ISO 12,800

I tested the 70D in an exhibit hall of black and white photos by famous photographer Paul Strand. This photo was taken with the Canon 70D and a Tamron 17-35mm f2/8 lens.

I set the 70D at maximum ISO of 12,800. Exposure was 1/350 second at f/4.0.


I could have reduce the ISO a bit since I had a faster shutter speed than I needed, but this was a test of the maximum ISO setting. I was really surprised that the color noise was not outrageous at such an extreme ISO setting.

It is definitely there and if I were using this image for anything else but this web site I would apply a color noise reducing filter with Photoshop.

Back in the days of film photography the highest ISO (ASA back then) film I shot with was 400 and if it was black and white I could process it myself and "push process" to ISO 1000. The grain was significant, although sometimes it gave an artistic emotional feel that worked for some types of photography.

The fact that we can now shoot at an ISO of 12800 with an APS-C sensor like the 70D's is remarkable. I am not a sensor expert but I believe it's the combination of the more than 20 megapixels combined with the 70D's Digic 5+ processor that has made such an improvement in high ISO performance of the EOS 70D.

This exhibit hall was quite dark and it made an interesting location for what is labeled "street photography," I was sitting on a bench with my Canon resting in my lab, waiting for all of the visitors to be in the right spot to get this photo.

I liked the way that each of these visitors were deep within their own thoughts when I clicked the shutter

Here is the link to the magnified image of this Canon EOS 70D 128000 ISO photo:

Magnified 70D Photo

Your comments are most welcome.






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Time Lapse Photography With the Canon 70D

by 70D Fan
(USA)

Canon EOS 70D Camera

Canon EOS 70D Camera

I made a few mistakes at my first attempt with time lapse photography and my 70d. It was still a lot of fun to try something new and I definitely learned a few things in the process.

I used a shutter cord/intervalometer made by Neewer and it worked flawlessly with my 70D.


Time Lapse Video



70D Ice Melt Time Lapse With 70D on Youtube


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70D Easily Fits My Waist Bag-BeltPack-Belly Bag

by Canon Geek
(USA)

70D Fits in Belt-pack Easily

70D Fits in Belt-pack Easily

The 70D fits nicely in a small belt-pack "belly bag." If you are looking for a hands-free way to carry your 70D this idea might appeal to you too.

The photo above is of an Everest waist-level hiking bag. It is not designed as a camera bag, but rather a hiking bag with its own belt.


I actually used that belt-pack to take my Canon 5D Mark III to the top of Half Dome in Yosemite-it was really awkward. With a Canon 24-105 mm f/4 lens attached it was a real tight squeeze.

I loved the convenience of having a camera available so close but I had to point the lens in first at an angle and then forcefully slide the camera downward into the pouch.


What a pleasure it was recently to use this same belly bag with my 70D. The 70D is significantly smaller in footprint and in height than the 5D Mark III.

If you want to only hike hands, arms and shoulder-free and take along your 70D and a lens or two this is a great way for you to go. I use my belly bag on almost all of my photo excursions, sometimes in conjunction with a small backpack for food, water, and extra clothing.


You can't fit as much camera gear in a beltpack as you can in a backpack camera bag, but they are even more convenient that traditional Sling Bags.


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Written by Bruce Lovelace



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